Julia Swan and Winston Huynh are a nurse couple living in Rankin Inlet, pursuing the same career. Photo courtesy of Julia Swan Stewart Burnett, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Early in the pandemic, couple Julia Swan and Winston Huynh – both registered nurses – saw a job ad for nurses in Nunavut.

“We thought to ourselves, ‘What an amazing adventure that would be to pick up our lives and relocate to the North,’” said Swan about the life-altering decision she and her husband Huynh were about to make.

That was three years ago and the pair are still here, along with a new, eight-month-old member of the family.

Both work in Rankin Inlet at the Kivalliq Health Centre.

“On our unit we care for patients from all over the Kivalliq region, from small newborn babies up to Elders and everyone in between,” said Swan.

She called nursing in Nunavut a rewarding experience and said she has formed many close friendships with colleagues and community members.

“It feels like one big family,” said Swan.

The position has also allowed her to step outside her comfort zone.

“Every shift is different,” said Swan. “You have to be flexible and ready for anything. I genuinely do feel empowered by the impact I’m making here in the lives of our patients and their families.”

She called experiencing Inuit culture, the language and traditions an unforgettable and enriching experience.

“The land, the climate, vibrant people,” said Swan. “There are so many opportunities for personal and professional growth here in Nunavut.”

By Stewart Burnett, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Original Published on May 12, 2023 at 10:46

This item reprinted with permission from   Kivalliq News   Rankin Inlet, Nunavut

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